Sherrod’s, 1978

In the late evening of January 14, 1978, several witnesses described a strange man at Sherrod’s Disco, a night club popular with students and located next door to the Chi Omega Sorority House. The man appeared awkward, out of place with the college crowd, and seemed to be at the club just to leer at the dancing young women. Just hours afterwards, in the early morning hours of January 15, a similarly dressed subject entered the Chi Omega House and brutally attacked four young women in their beds, killing two of them. In the days following the murders, the Sherrod’s witnesses came forward to describe their experience with the peculiar man they’d seen that night at the disco.

Continue reading “Sherrod’s, 1978”

The Utah State Prison: Part I, 1976

This is the first installment of Ted Bundy’s Utah State Prison records, released to me after a year of denied appeals to the Utah Dept. of Corrections and a final, successful appeal to the Utah State Records Committee. This is the first time these records have ever been seen outside of the Utah Department of Corrections. These records document Bundy’s actions during the six months he spent in the Utah State Prison after his kidnapping conviction and sentencing in July, 1976. Notably, he planned an escape in October after learning that Colorado was planning to extradite him for the January 1975 murder of Caryn Campbell. The plan was thwarted and Bundy was transferred to Aspen in January, 1977.

Continue reading “The Utah State Prison: Part I, 1976”

A Letter from Carole Ann Boone, 1977

A letter of love and encouragement from Ted’s ‘girlfriend’ and eventual wife, Carole Ann Boone, sent at some point in late 1977 prior to his second escape. Carole seems to be pleading with Ted not to attempt an escape as a “solution” to captivity. This letter was found in Bundy’s jail cell in Garfield Springs, Colorado after his second escape.

Continue reading “A Letter from Carole Ann Boone, 1977”

Taylor Mountain, 1975

Over the years, detectives and authors alike theorized that the skulls found on Taylor Mountain in 1975 meant Bundy had decapitated Washington victims Lynda Healy, Susan Rancourt, Kathy Parks, and Brenda Ball. This is because at the time of the discovery of the crime scene, apart from the skulls all of the bones taken into evidence were deemed to be of animal origin. In 2005, the King County Medical Examiner’s office rediscovered a misplaced box of miscellaneous remains and identified several to be human leg bones. The results of DNA testing on those bones disproved the long held belief that only skulls were found on Taylor Mountain.

Continue reading “Taylor Mountain, 1975”